FOOD: 6 Tips to Eat Like a Local in Japan

From amazing street food, to exquisite dining, and opportunities to learn cooking secrets from the masters, Japan offers you food experiences like nowhere else in the world. Check out these helpful tips for eating like a local in Japan:

1. Train Station Boxed Lunches

Aso-san Eki-ben

Ekiben are boxed lunches sold at train stations and on trains throughout Japan. Stations that offer ekiben pride themselves on unique presentations of local flavors and specialties, ready to be enjoyed from the comfort of your train seat.

 

 

2. Department Store Food Halls

Department Store Food Hall Japan

Meals in Japan don’t always have to break the bank. Visit a department store basement level at closing time when shop owners are eager to sell off the days remaining product and get great discounts on freshly prepared meals.

 

 

3. Izakaya: Japanese Pubs

Izakaya

For a place to eat, drink and hang out with friends, try a Japanese pub. The low prices and shareable dishes are great for groups and the extensive menu options make it easy to find something for even the pickiest eaters. Also, be sure to remember that there is no tipping!

 

 

4. Take A Cooking Class

Japanese Cooking Class

Want to really immerse yourself in Japanese cuisine? You can learn how to make dishes such as sushi and soba from the chefs themselves. Don’t forget the best part – you get to eat your work when you’re finished.

 

 

5. Stand Up Noodle Shops

Stand_up_soba

Usually featuring soba or udon noodles, stand up noodle shops are a common fixture in train stations and shopping thoroughfares in Japanese cities. Warm up with a hot bowl in the winter or cold noodles in the summer. Either way, surrounded by noodle slurping locals, this is a can’t-miss cheap and quick meal.

 

 

6. Conveyer Belt Sushi Shops

Conveyor belt sushi

Conveyer belt sushi bars allow you to experience sushi in Japan at a price (and pace) closer to fast food. Offering fresh seafood ubiquitous in Japan, with plates starting at 100 Yen (about $0.80), how can you not afford to get filled up on sushi?

 

 

photo credit: Salads via photopin

13 comments
Marsha Lavoie
Marsha Lavoie

You can get a quick, decent, inexpensive meal at combini such as 7 Eleven, Lawson and Family Mart. These stores are just about eveywhere in Japan.

Sarah Farless
Sarah Farless

I got this down pat I don't need an article to tell me. LOL

Sally Smith
Sally Smith

ha ha I was going to say.... we dont need to be schooled in that jandra....*twirls the chopsticks in her fingers like a pro*

Melanie Modena Wilder
Melanie Modena Wilder

I should have no kids home plus disposable income by then - more noodles for me!

Judi Price
Judi Price

Melanie... think we've got this down pat ;)